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Resources for the discerning pet owner

Here you'll find articles on pet care, seasonal health tips and fun facts to help you make sure your pet lives a happy, healthy life. See also our Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ), How-to videos and Support section. 
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FLEA & TICK PROTECTION TIPS

You may not see them, but they're there. Fleas and ticks can be nestled in hiding places inside and out without you ever knowing it.

Make your yard less appealing to ticks by cutting grass short and eliminating brush piles

Periodically, wash your pet’s bed cover in hot water and dry it on a high heat setting to kill any flea eggs and larvae

Vacuum frequently in your home, especially carpets where your pet tends to lounge

Cover up all outside crawl spaces and garbage cans to deter wildlife that may carry fleas and ticks

Tips to keep your pet healthy

Send parasites packing. Learn how to keep your pet safe from fleas and ticks.

The Flea Lifecycle

Fleas: Hiding, lurking and ready to attack. You may not see them, but they're there.

Fleas infesting can occur in no time flat. See how quickly fleas can lay eggs and reproduce.

Not-so-fun facts to share

For every flea found in your home, there are about 80 others hidden from your sight!
A flea can drink 15 times its weight in blood in just a single day!
One flea can feed on your pet for 3 hours!
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THE FLEA LIFECYCLE
Eggs

Flea eggs represent about one-half of the entire flea population. They fall off pets as they move, scattering eggs in the environment wherever a pet goes.

Larvae

Larvae make up about 35% of an infestation. After hatching from the eggs, they hide in dark places, burrow deep into carpets or cracks in flooring where they feed on flea dirt. They grow, spin cocoons where pupae start to fully develop in a protected environment.

Pupae (cocoons)

Pupae account for about 10% of a flea infestation. Pupae are very well protected in their cocoons and virtually indestructible, waiting for the right signal that it's time to emerge.

Adults

Adults represent 5% of the fleas you see on your pet. A pet walking by, or people moving in the house, alert adult fleas to leave their cocoons and jump onto the pet to feed and mate, starting the cycle all over again. Adult fleas typically stay on their host until they die.

The Tick Lifecycle

The development cycle can last 1.5 to 2.5 years and is divided into 4 stages: eggs, larvae, nymphs, adult ticks

Ticks can transmit life-threatening diseases like Lyme disease and Babesiosis.

Not-so-fun facts to share

Ticks have barbs that attach to the skin, so they are not easily removed
Ticks can't jump so they elevate themselves on blades of grass and other vegetation to quest their host
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The Tick Lifecycle

Eggs

Adult females drop off host to lay eggs on the ground.

Larvae

Eggs hatch into sex-legged larvae that feed on first host (usually a bird or rodent), live off its blood for several days, then detach and fall back onto the ground.

Nymphs

In the ground, the well-fed larvae now molt into the next stage and are called nymphs. Nymphs have eight legs and feed on second host (a rodent pet, or human). Once well fed, the nymph detaches and falls back to the ground.

Adult

After leaving second host, nymphs molt and change into adults and attach to the third host (a rodent, deer, pet, or human) for feeding and mating. Once well fed, both males and females fall back to the ground. No time for cuddling, male ticks die right after mating and females will lay eggs, completing the cycle.

Identify the most common tick in your area:

Brown Dog Tick

Brown Dog Tick (1/2)

The brown dog tick (Rhipicephalus sanguineus) is a widespread blood-feeding parasite of mammals, with a strong tropism for dogs. R. sanguineus is able to complete each of the feeding stages of his cycle on dogs, including infestations that originate from ticks that are acquired indoors.
Female Rhipicephalus laying eggs brown dog tick

Brown Dog Tick (2/2)

Adult females feed on their host for several days before dropping and entering in a reproductive process. Each individual female can lay an average of 1,500–4,000 eggs in 24 hours. Unfed larvae, nymphs, and adults can persist in their environment for several months...

Watch How-To Videos

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How to search for ticks on your dog

How to search for ticks on your dog